Why are you eating? Are you truly hungry or is it just that time of day? Or perhaps, there is just food around that looks good. Take a moment to think about what is driving you to eat at this particular moment and take note of any behavior that is not helping you move towards you goals. There is nothing wrong with eating when you're not hungry, or eating for pleasure, but make sure you are aware of why you are doing it and do your best to make it a positive experience free of guilt and any negative emotions. 
What are you doing this weekend? I hope you’re signing up for MEND our new virtual 6 week workshop with the wonderful @rosiemolinary We launched a BONUS #bodykindness #podcast today and we have a coupon code for listeners. Enter SpiralUp at registration and you’ll save $130— all 6 weeks for $299 included our live session and Facebook group. Head on over to the podcast for Rosie and Rebecca insight. Then sign up for MEND with us... the only thing broken is how you see yourself. Starts 3/14

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This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
I acknowledge that you may want to lose weight for any number of reasons. It’s not my job to tell you what your motivation for weight loss should be. It is my job to help guide you in that journey to greater health, energy, and love. My goal is to teach women how to love themselves above all else, and then let weight loss follow gently in its path.
“My goal was to look like the women I admired in the fitness magazines. After attending a local fitness competition with a friend, I was able to find a trainer who educated me on the importance of eating healthier and exercising and how the two together were the key to obtaining an amazing physique. I changed my diet dramatically. I ate five small meals a day and began doing cardio five to six days a week, and the transformation was astonishing. I wanted to compete at the same local fitness competition I visited before beginning my journey, and I placed third in the Open Bikini going against women that were half my age! Competing was not only an amazing experience, but a huge confidence booster. I have gone on to accomplish so many amazing things in four-and-a-half years, including placing in competitions, being on the cover of a fitness magazine and becoming a contributing writer for several fitness magazines. This has shown me that I can accomplish anything I put my mind to and that age truly is just a number! Today I feel and look better than I did at 25.”
I like this article and my heart goes out to everyone struggling with obesity. I think the comments demonstrate that no one method works for everyone. Because of both mental and physical genetic variation we must find the way that works for us. Clearly physical activity and essential nutrients are play a huge role in health and weight loss. How you accomplish these goals can be done in may ways. Thanks for sharing this info.
“I started my 78-pound weight-loss journey by tracking everything I ate with the Lose It! app. I track right after I finish because if I wait until later, I don’t always remember. Sometimes I’ll even record before I eat, so I know if I have enough calories for the day. That, paired with daily weigh-ins helps to keep me accountable.” —Kari Hammond, 42

I love the idea of carb cycling and I tried it in the spring when I bought weight loss unlocked. With my Hashimoto’s condition, though, I really suffered during the low carb part of the cycle. I might try it again, and just do a lower carb diet during my last two weeks, but still keep it at 100-150g per day. It’s always a work in progress. Thanks for shedding more light on this!


The winter came and several work outs happened at Truman's Rec Center. I also committed to my first half marathon in April, so the start of the new year brought many morning runs. I kept experimenting with meals and trying new ways to cook foods I loved. Some weeks were great, and others were not. I kept my head up and reminded myself the hard work was worth it. It was worth it to take care of my body, to take care of my heart, and to take care of my mind.
At rest and low intensity training, when there aren't an influx of calories from food, the body prefers to use mostly fat stores for energy. And your body is almost always using some fat for energy, and you are also always store some for energy. Which is why "burning fat" and losing fat are not quite the same thing. Oxidizing fat for energy doesn't always mean you are losing fat. Fat loss, just like weight loss is more dependent on calorie control than hormones and fuel utilization. 
It is great to find articles like yours. For the last 6 months I have been exercising and eating healthier thanks to a great nutritionist and an amazing hypnotist http://www.tryhypnosisnow.comin New York. The first month I lost 12 lbs, probably because my body was used to such unhealthy food. Thereafter I have lost an average of 6 lbs per month. I am very close to my goal weight and my next test will be to see how I maintain my healthy weight. Wish me luck!
About: Normally, we’d skip right on over a blog that doesn’t identify the author’s name, but the woman authoring “Frantic at Forty” gave us pause. Why? Because her story is one that so many can relate to — a woman about to enter midlife trying to make sense of things and lose weight. The author started the blog just before she turned 40 as a way to stay accountable while she started out to give herself the only gift she wanted — thin. She’s lost plenty of weight, and, even more importantly, found some happiness in the process. We just hope that turning 40 doesn’t mean an end to her blogging.
About: On March 1, 2014, a visit to the doctor’s office really brought things home for Bobby. At 6 feet tall, Bobby weighed in at 345 pounds. To be at a healthy weight, his doctor said he needed to weigh 177 pounds, 168 pounds less than the weight he was at. In essence, Bobby realized he was essentially carrying around another person. The moment was the catalyst he needed to change. Rather than set any unrealistic expectations, Bobby decided to set the small, attainable goal of losing 2 pounds a week. So began his blog. And, guess what? It worked. Two years later, Bobby weighs in at 214 pounds (he looks great, by the way), and continues to take those small baby steps that are helping him achieve a healthy body. Bravo.

Another win for your morning cup of joe: Caffeinated coffee keeps things moving through the digestive tract. Since staying regular is key to a tighter-looking tummy, drinking about 8 to 16 ounces of java at the same time every day can help you stay on schedule. Remember: Sugary drinks can lead to weight gain, so skip fancy flavorings and synthetic sweeteners containing sugar alcohols, which can cause bloating.

Full Plate Living is a nonprofit dedicated to a simple mission: Encourage, educate, support, and inspire anyone who wants to live a healthier lifestyle. They don’t advocate for starving yourself, spending your life at the gym, or giving up the foods you love. They’re also not about fad diets or weight loss supplements. Instead, they offer practical, straightforward steps to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Visit the blog.
I didn’t realize just how many calories I was consuming, so tracking what I ate helped keep me aware of what I was putting in my mouth. I don’t count calories anymore, but I track macros (protein, carb, and fat grams) to keep my diet balanced and in check. Macros allows me to have my carrots and cake, too! If you’re interested in learning more or want to work together, check out my macro plan options!
The popular desire for the fastest weight loss possible will continue to support the continuation and emergence of "crash diets". Crash diets are typically extremely low calorie diets that require drastic measures - like eliminating multiple food groups, drinking only juice or soup for weeks, or fasting for multiple days. And depending on how long these diets persist, they have varying side effects. 

I know what you're thinking. If what I'm saying is true, why haven't you heard of it before? Simple... because it's never been sold to you. It's never even had a name! It's just how the human body was naturally designed to lose weight, and it's hard to sell a weight loss diet based on that alone. Not to mention, it's pretty hard to sell something that is free.


As I posted above, HS wrestlers (also, many other grappling sport athletes) aren’t given the full 24 hours to recover from depletion. Some sports have mat-side weigh-ins. Others are just given a few hours after weigh-in to replenish. For these sports, athletes are best served focusing on year-round nutrition strategies, ones that help them stay at a weight very close to the weight they’d like to compete at.

About: Lindsey’s real. That’s it. Her blog, her writing style, her topics...they’re from a real person who shares her real experiences in a way that’s anything but dull. Lindsey’s posts are always chock full of photos to tell the story better, and range from fitness, to eating, to life lessons and more. Lindsey started her blog as a way to maintain a healthy, active lifestyle while remaining full and happy, but it has over the years morphed into a funny mashup of recipes, reviews, travel, pets and healthy living. (Be sure to check out her “best of” section — which includes titles of posts like “The Time I Almost Got Arrested.” You can figure it out from there).
There’s a phenomenon I’ve see happen again and again. A husband and wife realize they’ve been enjoying their after-dinner snacks a bit too much and are seeing the numbers on the scale rise. They decide to embark on a healthy diet to shed those excess pounds and, ideally, lose weight fast. Two months later, the husband’s shed serious pounds and is looking trim, while the wife struggles to get the scale to budge, even after a diet full of kale salads and grilled chicken breast.
About: The Failed Dieter is a newly-launched website from Jessica, who formerly was the owner of Jessica’s World, a personal blog she used to chronicle her weight loss journey. Now, her blog has morphed into so much more — a place where Jessica gives tips and recipes for stopping yo-yo dieting, and choosing to live healthy. Jessica lost 50 pounds making small lifestyle changes and giving up bad habits. Now her mission is to help you do the same.

It’s important to never skip meals, as this slows metabolism and causes the body to store more fat. Eat foods with lots of minerals, including calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc. Also, get plenty of Vitamins B and C. Take Essential Fatty Acid supplements, or eat foods rich in omega 3 and omega 6. Eating these foods and getting some exercise will help to burn belly fat and increase metabolism.


About: Contrary to the title, Helen’s blog is anything but “another weight loss blog.” Helen’s been on a journey to lose weight since June 2013. She’s had many ups and downs along the way — which is one of the best things you’ll notice about her posts: that she never gives up and she is extremely positive no matter how difficult things get. If you’re looking to find real encouragement from someone who knows, look no further.
About: Jenn’s story is one we can all relate to. She’s struggled with her weight all her life, and has spent many times going up and down with winning over her food addiction — and succumbing to it. Her posts represent the deepest emotions we battle when it comes to food, and it’s her willingness to open up that really touches readers. She’s been blogging for a long time, and her constant battle is one that more people definitely should follow.
Weight Watchers is a household name for the majority of Americans. Why? Because it works. In fact, the U.S News and World Report named this the best weight-loss diet for 2016 in their annual rankings — and with good reason. The balanced program lets you eat what you want, track your choices via a points system, and build a weight loss support network with fellow Weight Watchers' members.
When eaten in moderate amounts, dairy products such as full fat cheese, creamed cheese, cream, sour cream, and Greek yogurt are fully compatible with a well-formulated ketogenic diet for most people. For cheeses and Greek yogurt, most of the whey protein is removed (along with most of the lactose). With cream and sour cream, the volume consumed (e.g., a few tablespoons) is such that neither the whey protein nor the lactose is an issue (unless someone is particularly lactose intolerant). In the end, the goal is to avoid foods or patterns of eating the suppress blood ketones; so, if there is any question about a negative metabolic response to dairy products, the best answer would come from testing blood ketones before and after a dairy containing meal.
About: Kristen is a country girl living in Oklahoma who recently started blogging about figuring out the whole “healthy living” thing with her husband and two dogs. Kristen loves life and is full of positivity, which is exactly why she started blogging about making healthier choices — so that she can continue to live life to the fullest. Her blog features posts of encouragement and practical tips, as well as her own personal ups and downs with making choices that create the total wellness package.

My wife is always desperate to control her weight. She has tried healthy diets similar to what you have listed above, and she has tried all the crash diets and diet pills and diet fads you can think of. She is still struggling, and she is only 25. Currently she has been told that part of her problem might be digestive issues (along the lines of Irritable Bowel Syndrome) PLUS the fact that she has needed to get 2 cortizone steroid shots in the past 2 years, which is said to encourage weight retention, PLUS AGAIN using an IUD contraceptive that messes with her natural hormone balance. The poor girl needs MORE than just a normal diet-routine and a little extra exercise. Do you have any safe advice for those, like my wife, with unusual and extra-ordinary conditions?
Ross Enamait is a boxing coach and trainer. He has a passion for high-performance conditioning, strength, and athletic development. His philosophy is that successful training requires figuring out what works for the individual. On Ross Training, he provides the research and real-world advice his experiences have backed up, but never a “my way or the highway” approach. Visit the blog.
Good question, Matt. Quite frankly, for the athletes I work with it’s not an issue. Because they’re able to regain almost 100% of their strength, power, and endurance come fight night. So they have two advantages: 1) they’re at 100% in terms of performance capacity while their opponents, who probably cut weight in a less effective way, are likely only at 80%, 2) they’re also heavier (which grants strength leverage advantages). You can see there are a lot of variables here, though. And that’s why a scientific approach is warranted.
So, we’ve scoured the internet, researched hundreds of blogs, and of all the incredible women we came across, these 35 inspirational blogs stood out the most. Not just because they’ve been through a weight loss transformation of their own, but because they have completely changed the way they see themselves throughout the process, the impact they have on their audience, and the fact that they are truly badass women who have a purpose, a message, and the vulnerability to lay it out on the line, in hopes that their journey will help just one person on theirs.
Only 11% of Americans correctly estimate their ideal daily calorie requirements, according to one survey. The rest of us tend to overestimate, says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Let's say you assume that consuming 2,000 calories per day will allow you to reach your target weight, but it really takes 1,800: Those extra 200 are enough to keep an additional 20 pounds on your frame. 
On my weight loss and fitness blog I don’t have any links of my own to anything, there are too many links out there promising you things that are just not true and don’t belong in a realistic world. I started my blog as my lady has had a problem all of her life, so I though she can’t be the only one so I started to blog about it. I do have ad-sense on my site, I believe a bit of income for our hard work is OK.
‘Lastly, if your nutrition is on point but you still have excess tummy fat, then you need to look at your training. There’s a real craze for high-intensity workouts and really pushing yourself at the moment, but training is a stress on the body, and if you’re not giving it the tools to manage that stress and recover from it, then it can lead things like excess belly fat.
Salt makes your body retain excess water, and that causes bloat that can affect your whole body, hips and thighs included. “Water follows salt, so the more you eat, the more water gets stored instead of being filtered out by your kidneys,” says Moskovitz. “By cutting back, you’ll notice almost an immediate change in how you feel and how your clothes fit.”
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