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Kenlie’s inspiring weight loss journey is the foundation of her blog, All The Weigh. Kenlie has lost over 100 pounds, two different times. Although this time around she’s only a few pounds shy of reaching her lowest weight as an adult (284 pounds)—she has learned that loving and accepting yourself is the most important part of the journey. Her blog is a place where she shares her thoughts, feelings, and everything that has influenced her throughout her transformation to better health.
While you may be tempted to eat as few calories as possible to lose weight more quickly, as mentioned above, it’s important that you don’t cut more than 1,000 calories from your daily diet or eat fewer than 1,200 calories a day — even if that means your energy deficit is smaller than 1,000 calories. Eat too little and you’ll slow down your metabolism and put yourself on track to regain the weight — often with a few extra pounds.

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If you want to lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you take in. Simple as that. Heart-pumping cardio is a great way to up your calorie burn, and many forms of cardiovascular exercise also focus on toning the legs simultaneously: think running, cycling, or jumping rope. If you’re only doing a few light cardio workouts per week, increase that number to burn more calories. The CDC recommends 2 hours and 30 minutes of heart-pumping cardiovascular exercise per week. You should also be mixing up your workouts by incorporating High Intensity Interval Training, which helps burn fat fast and has you doing calorie-torching plyometrics, in addition to strength training, which will get into in a little bit for its metabolism-boosting benefits!
The truth is your metabolism is not just one function that you can easily manipulate, its a series of bodily functions that exist in all of your cells throughout your body. And it's main function is not to maintain weight, it's to sustain life by converting food and reserved fuel into usable energy you need to breathe, think, pump blood, move, and keep on living.  
Becky Duffett is a contributing nutrition editor for Fitbit and a lifestyle writer with a passion for eating well. A former Williams-Sonoma cookbook editor and graduate of San Francisco Cooking School, she’s edited dozens of cookbooks and countless recipes. City living has turned her into a spin addict—but she’d still rather be riding a horse. She lives in the cutest neighborhood in San Francisco, spending weekends at the farmers’ market, trying to read at the bakery, and roasting big dinners for friends.
“I served in the U.S. army for 11 years as a computer hardware/software specialist before I was medically discharged due to thyroid cancer in 2005. Initially, I was misdiagnosed with asthma and was pumped with heavy doses of prednisone steroids, which sent me from a size 4 to a size 20 in one year. Both my endocrinologist and family doctor said not to expect to get back into my size 4s ever again. However, I wanted to join the Wounded Warrior’s cycling team to support disabled veterans, so I had to get back to cycling over 100 miles. I teamed up with a personal trainer, Justin Roberts, at Retro Fitness in Florham Park, NJ, in December 2015. When he saw how determined I was, he told me about competing in the 90-Day Challenge. During my training, I learned the importance of choosing quality exercise over quantity. Especially with my schedule of work, home, school and the gym, I had to get the most out of the limited time I had to work out. I typically do 30 minutes of weights three times a week with cardio in between and one rest day.”
The above exceptions may work for some overweight people. But both in my practice as a psychologist and from personal experience I can attest to the fact that such exceptions can be disastrous. There is increasing evidence of an addictive component to overeating, especially when it comes to sugar and refined grains such as those in pasta and bread products. For many people, suggesting that an occasional indulgence is OK is tantamount to telling an alcoholic s/he can have an occasional beer. Its much easier not to start than to stop. After a few months of eliminating sugar and flour from one’s diet, those “occasional treats” will seem unhealthy and the high likelihood that eating them will trigger a cascade of further unwanted cravings will serve as ample deterrent to indulging in them. I have stayed off those “treats” for over 8 years, eating ample amounts of fruits, nuts, raw and cooked veggies, beans, fish, chicken and small amounts of cheese, oatmeal and brown rice and I have never enjoyed food as much as I do now
Salt makes your body retain excess water, and that causes bloat that can affect your whole body, hips and thighs included. “Water follows salt, so the more you eat, the more water gets stored instead of being filtered out by your kidneys,” says Moskovitz. “By cutting back, you’ll notice almost an immediate change in how you feel and how your clothes fit.”
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