Thank you for your insightful comments which can be taken either way depending on your point of view. Personally I have not gone for a Ketogenic diet, just a massive Carb/Sugar reduction to attain fat loss. Let me say at the outset that I am not a trained Medico, nor do I pretend to be. Also I am 70+, no heart disease, no implants, just a Parietal Vagotomy where half the Vagus nerves of the upper part of my stomach were cut to prevent Stomach Ulcer formation. I assume that since these nerves were cut there is poor communication between my stomach and my brain to tell my brain that I have had enough to eat and to stop pumping Insulin. But that is another issue.
Bites of things ‘here and there.’ Sure, you’re no longer eating cereal for breakfast or pasta as a side dish (WIN!), but do you occasionally have just a little taste of the dessert at a dinner party or order the breaded chicken and ‘try’ to scrape it all off? Do these occurrences happen often enough that it could be contributing to a weight loss plateau?
"Feeling stressed can wreak havoc on our bodies. It can cause our body to produce the steroid hormone cortisol, which can make you crave sugary foods that provide instant energy and pleasure. Short-term bursts of cortisol are necessary to help us cope with immediate danger, but our body will also release this hormone if we’re feeling stressed or anxious. When our cortisol levels are high for a long amount of time, it can increase the amount of fat you hold in your belly."
I know you’ve heard this all before, I’m sure, but seriously my friend THANK YOU for this post it was amazing and made me feel Like 1. I’m not alone in this world of stress and eating and anxiety and 2. It’s a journey and I can do it !! Thank you! Ps I would love to know some of your tips and tricks in how you manage stress and anxiety, maybe another post
In fact, a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that even after 8 weeks of weight loss that resulted in significant reductions in CCK, just one week of ketosis returned CCK to baseline (pre-weight loss) levels.[4] In other words, even if you use famine-level calorie restriction to lose weight, you’d better pound the butter and cut carbs at the end unless you want to crave food all the time.
And now add to this the ketosis piece that makes solving this puzzle even more complex.  Is a calorie still a calorie if cutting carbohydrate to the point of inducing nutritional ketosis reduces appetite, allowing the same level of satiety with a reduced energy intake? (Boden 2005)  Does the keto-adapted individual feel the same need to reduce spontaneous physical activity while losing weight?  What might a barely measurable increase in energy expenditure in a short-term study translate to over a longer duration?  Theoretically, just a one hundred Calorie per day deficit translates to 10 pounds of body fat lost over a year.
Excellent question! I suppose you could look at it like this: you are less insulin sensitive in the luteal phase, so in order to prevent fat gain it is “more important” to burn sugar and fat at this time – so if weight loss is your goal, and if you do good, hard anaerobic workouts, then this will sharpen your insulin sensitivity as much as possible and help keep you lean via that mechanism. If, on the other hand, weight loss is not your goal but fitness and strength are, then you may wish to do aerobic work at this time (with higher blood sugar you can accomplish greater aerobic feats), and save the anaerobic work for the rest of your cycle. Does that make sense? At least, that is what I am guessing is happening here.

About: Holly’s story starts and ends with food. Years ago, Holly spent every waking minute obsessing over every calorie, every bite and trying every yo-yo diet she could think of to shed pounds. But then one day she woke up and realized she would never find happiness living that way. She began focusing on finding a love of healthy food and cooking, a love she now shares on her blog and sees as her true purpose in life. There, you’ll find everything you need to learn to enjoy food again without all the guilt.
Including your significant other in your workouts can help to keep you on track, even if your goals aren't necessarily the same. "My hubby and I make exercise outings 'our' time," says Twyla Grimes, who knocked off 26 pounds by combining an hour on the stairmill or treadmill with strength training. "We'll go to the gym for an hour and lift weights together. Having him there keeps me accountable."
Execute a thigh-toning workout with equipment at the gym. Doing weight-training exercises will give your thighs a leaner, more defined appearance as you melt away the fat. Build a workout around tools such as dumbbells, barbells and machines. Target the quadriceps and hamstrings, which are the main muscles in the thighs, in these workouts. Perform exercises such as squats, lunges, step-ups, leg extensions and leg curls. Use the cable pulley machines to work your inner thighs or adductors and your outer thighs, your abductors. Aim for 10 to 12 reps, do four or five sets and work out two or three days a week.

Some of us no longer have the strong joints we had as teenagers. Jogging is out of the question and walking doesn’t cut it. The good news is elliptical trainers provide an intense, low impact cardio workout. In fact, a 145-lb. person can burn about 300 calories in 30 minutes on an elliptical trainer. That’s about as many calories as running burns, but without the joint wear-and-tear.
The key to losing weight is eating fewer calories than you expend. That creates an energy deficit, so your body taps into other sources of fuel — namely, your fat stores — to make up the difference. You’ll be able to lose weight safely by creating an energy deficit of up to 1,000 calories a day, which will allow you to lose up to two pounds per week.

Insulin is released when there is excess glucose or sugar present in the blood, typically after consuming a meal containing carbohydrates. Insulin works to help store glucose in muscles and fat cells for reserved fuel stores that can be used as energy when food is not being eaten, as well as maintain normal blood sugarlevels for immediate energy/bodily functions. Fat is only stored when there is a calorie excess. Having a higher lean mass and controlling blood sugar efficiently will also help ensure more of the food you eat is utilized for energy and not stored as fat. 

About: Meg’s blog is a primary example of the two sides of online blogging: the challenges of knowing what to share (and how much of it to share), mixed with the benefits (the inspiration and encouragement bloggers get from their readers). Meg used to blog in private, but eventually morphed into a public blogger, where she shares not just her progress losing weight, but also recipes she’s tried, fitness that worked (and didn’t work) for her, stories, rants and so much more. Plus, her cat is really cute.
Salt makes your body retain excess water, and that causes bloat that can affect your whole body, hips and thighs included. “Water follows salt, so the more you eat, the more water gets stored instead of being filtered out by your kidneys,” says Moskovitz. “By cutting back, you’ll notice almost an immediate change in how you feel and how your clothes fit.”
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