About: Georgina is a natural in the kitchen. She loves experimenting with new recipes, often figuring out ways to make them healthier, as well as crafting and just generally living a happy life. When she started her blog four years ago, it was for a long time only read by her mother. Now, it’s a huge part of Georgina’s life and features all sorts of yummy recipes, tips for finding happiness and wellness, beauty and crafts. Georgina’s also a very visual person, so you’ll find no shortage of photos to tell the story in an even more vibrant way.
Spending more time in the kitchen can help you shed belly fat, as long as you’re cooking with the right foods, according to one 2017 study. After analyzing data from more than 11,000 men and women, UK researchers found that people who ate more than five homemade meals per week were 28 percent less likely to have a high body mass index, and 24 percent less likely to carry too much body fat than those whole only downed three meals at home.
Learning to portion your food correctly is one way to get automatic calorie control without having to count or track your intake. Once you know your macro and calorie needs, take the time to stack your plate accordingly. Using a food scale, you can weigh out portions for ultimate accuracy or use your hands to quickly and roughly estimate a serving size that works for your needs.
A handful of almonds packs a serious fat-burning punch: One International Journal Of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders study of overweight adults found that eating about a quarter-cup of almonds for 6 months led to a 62 percent greater reduction in weight and BMI, thanks to a compound that limits the fat absorbed by the body. And eating just 1.5 ounces of almonds daily led to a reduction in belly and leg fat, a 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association showed. For added effect, eat almonds before working out: The amino acid L-arginine can help you burn more fat while building muscle.
Great Article but so way OFF THE MARK to such a degree as to make me cry. Controlling weight gain can only be done by controlling, and reducing, blood levels of INSULIN – and there is no medication that can do that. But, and its a big BUT, one can reduce Insulin very precisely by eliminating sugar and carbohydrates from the diet and fasting, preferably at least 16 hours (I try for 20 hours) between meals. I am a type two diabetic of 25 years duration, and have been doing this for 3 months and not one hypoglycemic attack during this time with a weight loss of 19kgs, down to 69Kgs. To prevent hunger add a healthy, natural fat, such as butter, to your diet. Does wonders. If I understand it correctly the reduction of Insulin below a certain level allows the body access to the body’s fat stores so that it can finally burn off these fat stores.stores. Once Insulin reaches a certain blood level it PREVENTS the burning of fat stores – hence the need to FAST and reduce the Insulin. The fasting is also wonderful for Calorie restriction and it’s benefits. – Just my two cent’s worth – hope its been useful.

It is agreed that milk can really give you a positive effect when it comes to burning belly fat. According to a research of the researchers at the University of Alabama in Birmingham in 2010, among more than 100 premenopausal women participating the survey, fat in women who consumed foods high in calcium was significantly reduced. In fact, when you consume 100 milligrams of calcium per day, they will remove many bad agents around and in your internal organs which have been related to the rate of cancer or heart disease.
Overall, great article! Especially the emphasis on self acceptance, which is often lost in weight loss plans playing on false notions “transformation” and “finding the new you,” while subliminally encouraging body-shaming along the way. I do have a question about the very last sentence of the article though. You specify that these things work “for average adults who do not have contributing medical or psychological issues,” but what about those who do have such issues?
While you can get tests to evaluate the cortisol level in your blood, only you can determine your own innate level of stress. Take some time to evaluate if you are living in a constant (or close to constant) state of stress. You might also notice increased anxiety levels, mood swings, trouble sleeping, fatigue (including feeling tired but unable to wind down) and high blood pressure.
It should come as no surprise that the more strength training you do, the more muscle mass you'll acquire — a good thing, considering all the metabolism-boosting benefits of muscle mass. Here's the catch: While muscles take up less room than fat, they weigh more than fat by volume. In other words, when you amp up your workouts, you might notice your pants fitting better without any change in your weight. It's why you'll feel much better if you step away from the scale and toward the mirror, where you'll really see your efforts paying off. 💪
21. Keep it simple. "I take a minimalist approach to nutrition: My diet consists of lean protein (chicken breast, egg whites, ground turkey), complex carbs (quinoa, sweet potatoes, oatmeal), healthy fats (coconut oil, almonds, avocados), and leafy green veggies. I eat as clean as I can—locally-grown vegetables, organic when possible, and minimally-processed everything."
I found your blog through the Nutrition Blog Network and I feel like I’m reading the story of my own life. I have recently lost 45lbs but am KILLING myself over those last 10 lbs just like you were. I literally have felt like it was hopeless and that there is no way those pounds are coming off. I am also limited to 1200 calories a day but am going to try raising my daily calorie intake to see if that helps! Your story gave me so much hope that I can beat these last 10 lbs and your weight loss tips were fantastic!
I think another great thing about having a blog and being a part of the community of health blogs is how open people are with weight loss/gain. I’ve struggled with weight my whole life and never had a lot of people to talk to because people around me weren’t going through it or felt ashamed to admit guilt over gaining a few pounds or that they secretly knew all the over exercise was actually a bad thing. It can be very isolating and reading other people’s journeys is so wonderful. Thanks for sharing your story!
There are a couple of things I tried my best to remember each day. One of the biggest things was portion control. Portion control makes such a difference! What I mean is having one serving of something instead of two or three. It means that when I went out to dinner, I would eat half of my giant plate and take the other half home for lunch the next day. I think I always thought my body needed more food than it actually did. I used to eat something as soon as I started feeling hungry, but it's actually totally normal for our stomachs to feel hungry sometimes. That isn't to stay you should starve yourself by any means, but let yourself get hungry before you go in for a big meal. I remember packing multiple snacks (granola bars, pretzels, candy, etc.) for the 3 hour drive from Kirksville to St. Louis, which just wasn't necessary at all - I now pack one snack like some fruit or granola.  
Agree with all the choices except one, SOYBEANS sadly the soybeans even from 50 years ago are different than the ones now, virtually almost all are GMC’s. Bad things can happen if ingested more than twice a week, for men excess estrogen which can lead to developing breasts etc, for women breast cancer is much more common. Fermenting them is the only way to solve the problem.
While many professionals tout light bouts of resistance training for women, the truth is that light weight will only allow the body to adapt to so much. While it may seem counterintuitive, using heavier weights can have a more favorable outcome for weight loss.[7] Not only does heavy resistance training create a greater calorie expenditure for up to 24 hours post-workout, but it can also help you add muscle mass, which helps you burn more calories at rest!

If it’s working for you I wouldn’t worry. I think health problems with low carb are slightly less of a concern in later years simply because there aren’t any hormones around to mess up. 🙂 I would simply be very cognizant of potential changes or symptoms – and if you start to notice weight gain, thyroid symptoms, etc while IF/carb cycling then it might mean it’s time to simply lighten up the IF and add in a few more carbs. you don’t need to eat HIGH carb but some relaxation of your guidelines, or playing with them a little bit, could be called for eventually (or now if you so choose) 🙂


Natural weight loss is about more than skipping the fad diets and diet pills, it's about learning the basics of weight reduction and what works best for your unique body. It's also about discovering how to get results safely. While some popular health trends have some merit, others may not be worth your time. And understanding how dieting works in general is one of the easiest way to filter through the noise.  
“I lost weight with consistent exercise and diet. First I did Weight Watchers, then 5:2/The Fast Diet, then Whole30, and I'm finishing up with the Fast Metabolism Diet. For three years now I have been doing HIIT/kettlebell training three times a week, and it really has changed my body positively. I also spin two to three times a week—I’m a SoulCycle addict—and have really found workouts that fit my schedule and love the endorphins. My biggest advice would be to team up. Every time I have done so, I have realized more success. Whether it be my kettlebell training with my mom friends at bootcamp or dieting with a pal, it is so much easier to do it with a support system.”

Several months in, I finally found the energy to start moving. I call it moving because it was hardly intense exercise. Addison was an extremely difficult baby from 0-15 months and I got very little sleep for as long as I can remember. She literally cried all night and all day. It was all I could do to get out the door and make myself move. But I did. I walked the 1.2 mile super hilly loop around our neighborhood pushing Addie in a stroller at least 4 days a week. I eventually graduated to two and then three continuous loops around the neighborhood but that was about the extent of my workout routine. Although it was super difficult at times, I stuck to this routine of eating good and walking the hood (hehe that rhymes) and in approximately eight months I had lost close to 80lbs.
Rather than training hungry, drink a protein shake before you go. One scoop, or about 20 grams, is sufficient. Whey is a great choice because it's easy on the stomach, quickly absorbed, and has an enormous list of additional benefits. Numerous studies have shown that ingesting more high-quality protein leads to both increases in muscle mass and decreases in fat mass.[8]
So how do you address any—or all—of these problems? The first thing, says Dr. Daniel Maman of 740 Park Plastic Surgery is to address the quality of the skin. Dr. Maman is a Harvard trained, board-certified plastic surgeon who helps men and women address thigh fat issues with both surgical and non-surgical treatments. He says that the thighs are difficult to treat because the quality of the skin in that area is unique.
Fleury, N., Geldenhuys, S., & Gorman, S. (2016, October 11). Sun exposure and its effects on human health: Mechanisms through which sun exposure could reduce the risk of developing obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(10), 999. Retrieved from https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/13/10/999/htm

When you've got a lot of weight to lose, deciding where to begin can be super-overwhelming—but we've got a good place for you to start. We've talked to dozens of women who completely transformed their bodies—we're talking shedding 50-plus pounds—and pulled together a list of the eight simple changes they made that had the biggest impact on the scale. Their tried-and-true tips might be exactly what you need to get on the path to serious results. But don't just take our word for it: These women's results speak for themselves.
About: Besides Nadia’s beautiful smile, it’s her philosophy on life that really drew us to her blog. Yes, Nadia is passionate about all things fitness and healthy eating, but she’s even more passionate about spreading the message that perfection is impossible and the key is to love yourself for who you are. That’s the kind of heart Nadia puts into each and every one of her posts as she strives to help people find their own version of happiness.
Katie’s weight has been a challenge her entire life. But after having two boys, she reached an all-time high: 253 pounds. That was when she decided to make a change, but it didn’t happen right away. For the next three years, she dieted and bounced between losing and gaining 50 pounds. Her real weight loss journey began in 2009, when she used calorie counting and running to take off 125 pounds. Today, she writes about maintaining that loss, running, being a mother, and managing a bipolar diagnosis. Visit the blog.

On top of exercise, it’s nutrition. I believe they go hand in hand. In the beginning, improving nutrition was just as hard as improving fitness, except for sometimes now I think nutrition is more challenging. Exercising was just 1 - 1.5 hours a day of busting your butt, but nutrition was the remaining 22 hours, so there were way more opportunities to fall short or not eat as well as I could. However, because I think it is important to be optimistic, I will say that there were 22 hours a day to nourish my body with good and healthy foods. It just took me a long time to figure out the best way to do that (and just to clarify, I'm still figuring it out.)
Tina, that’s awesome. You said some things that rang true for me. At 53 years old, I was exercising plenty, but I love to eat! I was not good at portion control. personally I had to start intermittent fasting. I’ve lost ten lbs in the first few weeks, but have hit a plateau. What I am doing now is going more paleo, modified paleo. I also need to have more discipline in staying the course on exercising, which I love to do, but work often gets in the way. I came across a fitness /diet routine that is one of the most popular in the country , at the moment https://bit.ly/2LTeGBG, looks pretty good. Really it’s not rocket science, although we in the west make it hard. Eat whole foods in moderation, get enough rest, reduce stress, and exercise, not insanely, but regularly. Aerobics and some form of weight bearing exercise seems to be the best combination.
Eating a large amount of protein will leave you feeling full, thus decreasing your appetite. Protein also has the unique ability to boost metabolism by helping maintain and even build muscle mass. There has been some correlation between high protein diets and a reduction in belly fat. The best way to ensure you are getting enough protein is to eat a little at every meal. A general rule of thumb for high protein intake is to get around 1 gram of protein for every pound of bodyweight. For example, a 130 pound person would aim to get 130 grams of protein each day. Excellent sources of protein come from lean meats, eggs, nuts, etc.
In fact, a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that even after 8 weeks of weight loss that resulted in significant reductions in CCK, just one week of ketosis returned CCK to baseline (pre-weight loss) levels.[4] In other words, even if you use famine-level calorie restriction to lose weight, you’d better pound the butter and cut carbs at the end unless you want to crave food all the time.
While calcium is generally thought to be primarily beneficial for bone health, it’s also crucial for building strong muscles. Calcium is essential for encouraging muscle contraction, which promotes muscle growth. Fortunately, for those who need to shed fat on their legs, calcium-rich foods can also help them feel the burn; research published by the American Diabetes Association reveals that increasing calcium intake promoted fat loss among overweight diabetic study subjects on a calorie-restricted diet.
×