As a personal trainer, I meet people of all shapes and sizes. Before beginning a training routine with any of my clients, I always sit down and speak with them first. One of the many questions that I ask is, “What would you most like to improve about yourself?” An overwhelming majority point to their abdominal region. Now, an extremely common misconception is that you must perform hours of abdominal exercises to earn a 6-pack. While core training is an integral part of shedding belly fat, it is certainly not the only method to be used. The best ways to burn belly fat, may actually surprise you.


The amount of oxygen your body needs, and how quickly you need it, is closely related to the type of fuel you burn and the amount of calories you are burning in total. As intensity increases, oxygen become less available - think about sprinting up a flight of stairs and running out of breath. And at a higher intensity, your body needs energy faster. So when oxygen is hard to come by and quicker sources of energy are necessary, your body switches its fuel source from fat to carbs. 
Nutritional ketosis induced by carbohydrate restriction is often associated with major weight loss, which raises some important questions. Do ketones cause weight loss? Do ketones promote a metabolic condition whereby fat melts away to a greater extent than a non-ketogenic diet of equal energy content?  Alternatively, can a person maintain or even gain weight while in nutritional ketosis?  To explore the answers to these questions, we need to venture into the complex inter-relationships between keto-adaptation, appetite, energy balance and weight loss.
Take a walk through the supermarket, and you’ll be assaulted with aisle after aisle of low-fat and no-fat foods, “healthy” chips and cookies and juices and sodas galore. You likely already know that if you want to lose weight, cutting out processed foods and sweets is the first and most obvious step. But those healthy-sounding options can be just as bad, too.
I’m a nutrition graduate (MSc dietetics student) and I’m frankly shocked that this has been allowed to be published. It’s borderline “clean eating”, now proving to be an antecedent to eating disorders and pro Atkins. It also contradicts other articles written by Harvard: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/carbohydrates/low-carbohydrate-diets/
Tip #8 Look for patterns. Take note of other triggers and behaviors linked to your eating. Do you eat something every time you walk into the kitchen? Is 3 p.m. your candy-witching hour? Does a deadline cause you to reach for donuts? By spotting patterns around when, where, and why you eat certain foods, you can develop strategies to prevent them from recurring, and start working towards a healthier you.
Adiponectin is released by fatty tissue and is involved in the breakdown of fat for energy. Some studies indicate women and leaner individuals may have higher levels of adiponectin (102). Which is a good thing since high amounts have been associated with increased insulin sensitivity, promoting more efficient carbohydrate use and increased fat burning capabilities. 
Instead of turning to a chemical-filled protein bar post-workout, try adding some citrus to your routine and you’ll be well on your way to leaner, more toned legs in no time. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition found that animal test subjects whose diets were supplemented with polyphenols found in citrus fruit burned significantly more fat than those given a placebo. Considering the fact that citrus fruits are also loaded with inflammation-fighting vitamin C, you have the perfect after-exercise snack.
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