Thanks for the question here…when we say each gram of carbs holds on to 2.7g of water, that’s a little different than your protein question. Essentially what we’re saying is that for every gram of carbohydrate stored in the muscle, for example, 2.7 grams of water are literally bound up in that carbohydrate molecule. Likewise, when each gram of carb is depleted from the body, 2.7 grams of water are lost. So it’s simply a body weight issue. Lose 200 grams of carbohydrate from the body through exercise and a low carb diet, and close to 600 grams of water disappear too. Combined, that’s almost 2 pounds of weight lost. Cool, huh?
While some people fear the amount of sugar in fruit, have no fear! Fruit can be a part of a healthy weight loss diet. As with all foods, however, fruit should just be one component of a healthy diet. Strive to get 3 servings of fresh or frozen, plain fruit per day. Fruits give you fiber, water, vitamins and minerals. They can keep you healthy, hydrated and full!
Fat does not need to be avoided for weight loss. In fact, fat makes your food taste better and may promote better blood sugar control, providing lasting energy (54,55,56). But because fat provides more calories per gram than any other nutrient - 10g of fat provides 90 calories, compared to 10g of protein or carbs that only provides 40 calories- it can add a significant amount of calories to your diet if not accounted for.
Good question…they actually do…and it’s a horrible idea! During the hours leading up to a fight, while an athlete is depleting water and glycogen, exercise should be kept to a minimum. Not only does the athlete need to recover from a hard training camp (thus, taper off exercise) so they can perform during their fight, they need to prevent excess stress. Cutting weight is pretty stressful as it is.

While toning your muscles is best achieved through exercise, ditching the fat that’s obscuring them starts in the kitchen. Luckily, one easy way to get the ball rolling on fat loss outside the gym is a habit you probably already have: drinking coffee. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals that obese study subjects whose diet was supplemented with caffeinated coffee significantly increased their metabolic rate, and subjects of an average weight shed more pounds, too.

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